I’m sharing my story of why I believe I’d succeed as a financial planner who gets paid for their personal financial advice. If you’d like to participate or learn more, check out this post via XY Planning Network.

How many of us are focused only on making a living at the expense of making a life? I certainly have been guilty of this over the past few years, and the result was a feeling of emptiness. On paper my life looked great – a wonderful and loving fiancé (now husband), a nurturing and supportive tribe of family and friends, a promising career in corporate finance – but I wasn’t happy. I felt trapped by my job. I lived for the freedom of the weekend, dreading the inevitable Sunday Night Blues when the fun was over. For five years I struggled through the 9-to-5 (almost always longer) grind as a CPA before I reached my breaking point in early 2014; I felt there must be more to a career than simply working for money to pay the bills and buy pretty things, and so began my quest to translate my weekend joy into joy at work.

I immersed myself in this quest – devoured self-help books and podcasts, met with counselors and coaches, asked anyone willing to share how they discovered their passion in life. I didn’t know where the answer would come from but I trusted that if I asked I would eventually find it… and I did. It came in the most unexpected place:  an offhand comment from a friend as I contemplated abandoning my career in finance for one in psychology. “Have you ever thought about becoming a financial advisor? You already know a lot about finance and could use that to help other people figure out what to do with their money… and that’s what you like to do right, help other people?”

That simple idea changed everything for me.

Jess Lively, an intentional living coach and podcaster who I greatly admire, defines purpose as “serving in the present moment“, and I have come to see that this idea is the key to finding joy in work. To serve in the present moment is to focus on what you have to give to others rather than what you have to gain personally, and each one of us has a unique combination of talents and passion to share with the world. The principles of personal finance are something that come naturally to me; working as a financial planner draws on my innate capacity for math, problem solving and creative thinking, and teaching others these skills allows me to fulfill my deep desire to connect with and help others.

What we really want to do is what we are really meant to do. When we do what we are meant to do, money comes to us, doors open for us, we feel useful, and the work we do feels like play to us. –Julia Cameron

I gravitated towards a career in finance because it is what I enjoy and want to do; my knowledge is of value to others and I will make a living by charging for not only what I know but also how I package and share it. My take on personal finance is this: how we spend our money speaks volumes about what we value, but too often our spending is completely incongruent with what matters most to us in life. I’ve heard that people don’t buy information; they buy results, so let me be clear on this point: by working with me, you will learn how to align your spending with your values, learn how to spend intentionally, and learn how to create a Rich Life – a life grounded in what you value most.

So that’s how I will make a living, but how will I make a life? What I have to give is bigger than just teaching people how to manage their finances; I am on a mission to change the way we view the world of finance, of money. Recent scandals, collapses and financial turmoil have led us to believe that the pursuit of money is the cause of the world’s problems. We no longer trust the very people we should be able to turn to for advice and education about money. Of course, greed is a harmful force that brings with it fear and destruction, but money and desiring money in and of itself is not bad. As the controversial novelist and philosopher Ayn Rand said, “Money is only a tool. It will take you wherever you wish, but it will not replace you as the driver.” With this blog, with my work, I will start a movement to shift the focus of my generation from consumerism – which breeds scarcity and greed – to investing – which breeds abundance and generosity. I will teach others how to be the driver on their journey to a Rich Life.

And so I present to you this manifesto, a public declaration of my intent to create a world in which everyone will live a Rich Life.

A Rich Life

A Rich Life is not determined by how much money we make, but what we do with our money.

A Rich Life is grounded in what we value most.

The relationships we cherish.

The work we do.

It’s not about having a big house, a fast car, fancy holidays or expensive clothing. It’s about the really important things.

Love.

Joy.

Generosity.

Today we decide to create our Rich Life and commit fully to the process,

by paying ourselves first and living off what’s left;

by multiplying our savings through wise investments;

by insuring ourselves against the worst case scenario.

Because deep down, we are all working towards the same goal:

Freedom.

 

I’m sharing my story of why I believe I’d succeed as a financial planner who gets paid for their personal financial advice. If you’d like to participate or learn more, check out this post via XY Planning Network. How many of us are focused only on making a living at the expense of making a life? I certainly have been guilty of this over the past few years, and the result was a feeling of emptiness. On paper my life looked great – a wonderful and loving fiancé (now husband), a nurturing and supportive tribe of family and friends, a promising career in corporate finance – but I wasn’t happy. I felt trapped by my job. I lived for the freedom of the weekend, dreading the inevitable Sunday Night Blues when the fun was over. For five years I struggled through the 9-to-5 (almost always longer) grind as a CPA before I reached my breaking point in early 2014; I felt there must be more to a career than simply working for money to pay the bills and buy pretty things, and so began my quest to translate my weekend joy into joy at work. I immersed myself in this quest – devoured self-help books and podcasts, met with counselors and coaches, asked anyone willing to share how they discovered their passion in life. I didn’t know where the answer would come from but I trusted that if I asked I would eventually find it… and I did. It came in the most unexpected place:  an offhand comment from a friend as I contemplated abandoning my career in finance for one in psychology. “Have you ever thought about becoming a financial advisor? You already know a lot about finance and could use that to help other people figure out what to do with their money… and that’s what you like to do right, help other people?” That simple idea changed everything for me. Jess Lively, an intentional living coach and podcaster who I greatly admire, defines purpose as “serving in the present moment“, and I have come to see that this idea is the key to finding joy in work. To serve in the present moment is to focus on what you have to give to others rather than what you have to gain personally, and each one of us has a unique combination of talents and passion to share with the world. The principles of personal finance are something that come naturally to me; working as a financial planner draws on my innate capacity for math, problem solving and creative thinking, and teaching others these skills allows me to fulfill my deep desire to connect with and help others.

What we really want to do is what we are really meant to do. When we do what we are meant to do, money comes to us, doors open for us, we feel useful, and the work we do feels like play to us. –Julia Cameron

I gravitated towards a career in finance because it is what I enjoy and want to do; my knowledge is of value to others and I will make a living by charging for not only what I know but also how I package and share it. My take on personal finance is this: how we spend our money speaks volumes about what we value, but too often our spending is completely incongruent with what matters most to us in life. I’ve heard that people don’t buy information; they buy results, so let me be clear on this point: by working with me, you will learn how to align your spending with your values, learn how to spend intentionally, and learn how to create a Rich Life – a life grounded in what you value most. So that’s how I will make a living, but how will I make a life? What I have to give is bigger than just teaching people how to manage their finances; I am on a mission to change the way we view the world of finance, of money. Recent scandals, collapses and financial turmoil have led us to believe that the pursuit of money is the cause of the world’s problems. We no longer trust the very people we should be able to turn to for advice and education about money. Of course, greed is a harmful force that brings with it fear and destruction, but money and desiring money in and of itself is not bad. As the controversial novelist and philosopher Ayn Rand said, “Money is only a tool. It will take you wherever you wish, but it will not replace you as the driver.” With this blog, with my work, I will start a movement to shift the focus of my generation from consumerism – which breeds scarcity and greed – to investing – which breeds abundance and generosity. I will teach others how to be the driver on their journey to a Rich Life. And so I present to you this manifesto, a public declaration of my intent to create a world in which everyone will live a Rich Life.

A Rich Life

A Rich Life is not determined by how much money we make, but what we do with our money. A Rich Life is grounded in what we value most. The relationships we cherish. The work we do. It’s not about having a big house, a fast car, fancy holidays or expensive clothing. It’s about the really important things. Love. Joy. Generosity. Today we decide to create our Rich Life and commit fully to the process, by paying ourselves first and living off what’s left; by multiplying our savings through wise investments; by insuring ourselves against the worst case scenario. Because deep down, we are all working towards the same goal: Freedom.

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